No surprises in Tuesday’s election

No surprises in Tuesday’s election

DOWNTOWN­—As expected, incumbent Board of Aldermen President Lewis Reed and all 14 Democratic candidates for aldermen easily won in Tuesday’s general election in St. Louis. 

Showing once again that St. Louis is basically a one-party town, Reed garnered 15,169 votes to the 3,553 votes of perennial Green Party candidate Jerome Bauer. A total of 640 voters wrote in their own choices for the leader of the Board of Aldermen. 

In an especially light turnout, just 20,121 people, or 10.26 percent of registered voters, cast ballots. 

Only two of the Democratic candidates for alderman faced opposition. 

In Ward 6, Democratic incumbent Christine Ingrassia had 965 votes to the 199 cast for Michael Hebron, the lone Republican candidate for any office in the city. 

In Ward 24, Democratic nominee and newcomer Bret Narayan got 842 votes to the 126 votes for independent candidate Steve Basinger and the 57 for votes for independent candidate Michael Berg.

The unopposed winners for alderman were Ward 2 incumbent Lisa Middlebrook; Ward 4 incumbent Samuel Moore; Ward 8 incumbent Annie Rice; Ward 10 incumbent Joseph Vollmer; Ward 12 incumbent Larry Arnowitz; Ward 14 incumbent Carol Howard; Ward 16 incumbent Thomas Oldenburg; Ward 18 newcomer Jesse Todd; Ward 20 incumbent Cara Spencer; Ward 22 incumbent Jeffrey Boyd; Ward 26, newcomer Shameem Hubbard; and Ward 28 incumbent Heather Navarro.

In the election for St. Louis Community College trustee in Subdistrict 3, Anne Adams Marshall defeated Paula Savarino, 11,118 to 9,448. The subdistrict includes south St. Louis and the Maplewood-Richmond Heights, Affton, Bayless, Brentwood, Kirkwood and Webster Groves school districts.

And the Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District Proposition S lost in the county, 65,348 to 57,720. But it won in the city portion of the district, 10,097 to 9599.

The measure would have added an average of $2.25 on sewer bills and about $30 million a year to deal with flooding and erosion issues MSD can’t afford to deal with now. Over 30 years, this would raise about $562 million, enough to handle about 500 problems it has identified around the district.

“This is a service that we were offering up to the St. Louis community,” said Sean Hadley, manager of public affairs for MSD. “The voters voted it down, so we will not be doing the work.”

It will be up to those who have problems to fix it, Hadley said.